How Do Mortgage Companies Value A Property That Has Not Been Built Yet?

It’s obviously easier to picture the process of estimating value on an existing property in a neighborhood that has a history of home sales, but the task of determining the value on new construction projects does pose some challenges.

Appraisals on homes that haven’t been built yet generally require the contractor and home buyer to supply more documentation in order to get a more accurate estimate of the property’s value.

The main purpose of this article is to give an overview of the appraisal process for a home buyer that is building a home vs purchasing standing inventory.

For some, building a new home can be both exciting and overwhelming.  Watching a project transform from idea to completed home with a front yard, white picket fence and a custom red front door is a rewarding experience.

Even if you are paying attention to all of the information from the beginning, there are still several details that have a tendency to catch even experienced builders off guard.

Game time decisions have to be made as cabinets and corners line up differently than the initial drawing could show, flooring doesn’t match the wall colors, or the sun hits a window the wrong way at dinner time.

While the last minute updates may cost you more money, they might also have an impact on the value of the property.

What Does An Appraiser Need For New Construction?

Plans –

The plans or construction drawings are usually done by your builder or architect. It lays out the floor plan of your home, sizes of rooms and square footage of your home.

They should include a floor plan layout, front elevation, real elevation & side elevations, mechanical and electrical details.

Specifications / Descriptions Of Material –

A “Spec” sheet has the type of construction materials you will be using. For example, whether your home will be built with standard 2 x 4’s or 2 x 6’s.

It also contains the type of insulation, roofing and exterior products that will be used in the construction, as well as floors, counter tops and appliances for the inside dressing.

Cost Breakdown –

The document that breaks down all of the costs associated with the construction, including land, building materials and labor.

A lender can generally provide you with blank forms for the spec and cost breakdown if your builder does not have them.

Plot Plan –

Shows where your home will sit on the site, any accessory buildings, well and septic locations, if applicable, and the finish grade elevations and direction of the drainage.

Once the lender has obtained the above information from you, they will forward a copy to the appraiser. It is the appraiser’s job to determine what the future value of the home will be once it is completed, per your plans, specs & cost breakdown.

Even though an appraiser will use the cost approach in the appraisal report, it is not the value that will ultimately be used by the lender.  The market approach to value, which uses existing sales of homes similar in size, quality, construction and location is the most common approach that lenders want for new construction.

The more complete and detailed your plans, specifications and cost breakdowns are, the more accurate your appraisal will be.

Once your home is complete, the appraiser will be asked to go out and inspect the home. They will report back to the lender what they have found, whether your home was completed according to the plans and specifications originally given, and if the value is the same as originally given in the report.

Sometimes the value has to be adjusted due to changes that were made during construction which may have affected the value of the home.

…..

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q:  Where can I obtain a set of plans?

Most builders have basic plans they work from, and make modifications specific to their clients’ needs. When building a custom home, it’s generally a good idea to work with a reputable architect.

Q:  Is there a form I can use for the list of specifications?

Yes, HUD has a generic form that most lenders use and it will give the appraiser most of the details they need to complete your appraisal. Anything not listed on this form can be added by you separately on an additional sheet.

Q:  Can I use my contract with the builder for the cost breakdown sheet?

In most cases, the lender will accept the contract, however, they will want the builder to provide a cost breakdown to ensure that the builder has accurately bid your home.

_________________________________

Related Appraisal Articles:

March 28, 2010 by · Leave a Comment

Related Posts

About Allen

Allen is President and Founder of First Trust Mortgage, a family owned, 15 year old, mortgage planning firm in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. First Trust Mortgage was founded in 1996 and provides residential mortgages in Florida. Allen's vision for First Trust Mortgage was based on two principles. First was to help his clients make informed decisions regarding residential mortgages. Second was to build long lasting relationships with his clients and referral partners. Over the past 5 years Allen has concentrated his education and efforts in the area of managing Real Estate equity through mortgage planning. Allen was one of the first certified mortgage planning specialists in the State of Florida and is a regular guest of Steve Pomegranate's "On The Money" radio program on NPR and Ray West's "Talk About Money" radio program on WAFG. Allen also teaches continuing education classes to certified financial planners and insurance professionals around the subject of managing equity in real estate. Allen graduated from the Pennsylvania State University in 1983. Allen has been lending in Florida since 1985 when he joined Great Western Bank (Washington Mutual) managing the company's Florida Commercial Real Estate Mortgage operation. In 1996 /1997 Great Western Bank was sold to Washington Mutual and Allen formed First Trust Mortgage Corporation. In 2003 Allen focused his practice on Strategic Real Estate Equity Management and is considered to be an expert on that topic. Allen practices personally the concepts he shares with the clients, peers and financial service providers. Allen exclusively participates in the residential mortgage industry and has purposely chosen to hold no other licenses even though he has participated and passed the class requirement for the Florida Real Estate Commission, Florida Mortgage Broker, Health, Life & Variable annuities license. Specialties Helping Consumers, Realtors and Financial Service Professionals Keep Current On Mortgage Trends and Provide Mortgage Solutions As Needed. In Addition I Love To Educate Seniors On The Use of Reverse Mortgages and First Time Homebuyers On How Much Payment Is Enough.

Leave a Comment